SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – Suicide Blonde

The challenge this week is to select a song that is classified as new wave. I always like to try to find a song that I really like to share and today is no different.

The song “Suicide Blonde” was released in 1990 by Australian band INXS. The blues harmonica intro by Charles Musselwhite in immediately recognizable. It is one of the reasons I like this song so much. The harp intro was not recorded live but came from a sampler program Andrew Farriss was using.

The song was written by band front-man Michael Hutchence and keyboardist Andrew Farriss. The song has nothing at all to do with suicide, but sadly would be the last song Hutchence would perform live before he committed suicide in 1977.

The song is about a woman who “dyes” her hair blonde. The idea for the title of the song came from Hutchence’s then-girlfriend Kylie Minogue. Her movie “The Delinquents” had just premiered and she told Hutchence the color of the blonde wig she wore was  referred to as ‘suicide blonde’.

“Suicide Blonde” was the first single released from the band’s album “X”. The song reached #10 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.

Suicide Blonde
Lyrics from Songfacts.com

Don’t you know what you’re doing
You’ve got a death wish

Suicide blonde
Suicide blonde
Suicide blonde
Suicide blonde

Suicide blonde was the color of her hair
Like a cheap distraction for a new affair
She knew it would finish before it began
Wow baby I think you lost the plan

You want to make her suicide blonde
Love devastation, suicide blonde
You want to make her suicide blonde
Love devastation, suicide blonde

She stripped to the beat but her clothes stay on
White light everywhere but you can’t see a thing
Such a squeeze
A mad sad moment
Glory to you
Glory to you
Take me there
Take me there

Got some revelation
Put into your hands
Save you from your misery like rain across the land
Don’t you see the color of deception
Turning your world around again

You want to make her suicide blonde
Love devastation, suicide blonde
You want to make her suicide blonde
Love devastation, suicide blonde

You want to make
You want to make
You want to make her suicide blonde
You want to make
Aww

That’s the story

You want to make her suicide blonde
Love devastation, suicide blonde
You want to make her suicide blonde
Love devastation, suicide blonde

Love devastation
You want to make her suicide blonde
Love devastation, suicide blonde


Song Lyric Sunday is hosted every Sunday by Jim Adams. If you would like to join in the fun, check out his blog for the rules and to take in all the other music posted by other bloggers.

Advertisement
SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – Country Legends

This week the theme is to find Country songs, which is right up my alley. Jim talked the Bristol Sessions, Bristol indeed considered the birthplace of country music. It is also where I lived for a number of years. My family still lives in this area and there is still live music at the Carter Fold.

So what better way to salute country music than to honor the Carter and Cash families and a few other country legends.

Mother Maybelle Carter was a pioneer in country music. She developed a unique style on the guitar (now known as the Carter Scratch) and learned a blues finger picking style from African American musician and family friend Leslie Riddle. Maybelle Carter is credited with influencing the guitar’s place in country music.  In the video below, she plays Wildwood Flower (the song my mother felt every ‘real’ guitarist should be able to play.) Like so many country classics, the lyrics have changed slightly over the years. You can find them here.

Johnny Cash is a legend of country music no doubt, and I will not attempt to do his biography justice here. His life originated as J. R. Cash in Kingsland, Arkansas. (His parents could not agree on his name, thus the initials. When he joined the Air Force, he was told he could not have initials as a first name, so he became John R. Cash. The military changed the spelling of our surname as well so this was not unusual.) From a poor cotton farm to the world stage, he became a legend. His life was fraught with a drug addiction off and on from the late 1950s until the early 1990s. “I Still Miss Someone” is one of my favorites that I had the privilege to see him perform live. The lyrics can be found here.

June Carter Cash was the daughter of Maybelle and A.P. Carter. The Carter Family’s popularity exploded after The Bristol Sessions and they are often referred to as the first family of country music. Their harmonies laid the foundation for the harmony styles for years to follow. She traveled with her mother and sister as part of the trio “Mother Maybelle and the Carter Sisters”. She and Johnny Cash had an affair while both were still married. According to some articles, she is credited with co-writing “Ring of Fire” with Merle Kilgore about her affair with Johnny Cash. This is disputed By Vivian Liberto Cash (Johnny’s first wife). “Jackson” was one of their more recognized songs they performed together. You can find the lyrics here.

Roseanne Cash is the daughter of Johnny Cash and his first wife, Vivian Liberto. Her parents were divorced when she was 12 years old. While she traveled on the road with her father initially as his wardrobe assistant, she had not planned on a musical career. 15 albums, 12 Grammy nominations and 4 Grammy’s later, she is a recognized singer and composer in her own right. The song that follows, “Tennessee Flattop Box”, is a recording of one of her father’s songs and one of my personal favorites. You can find the lyrics here.

I saw the Highwaymen in a tiny little venue in Augusta, Maine. The venue was so small you were really sharing the stage with some of the true legends of country music. The Highwaymen (Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and Kris Kristofferson) recorded three albums, two for Columbia records and one for Liberty records. These artists were the ‘outlaws’ of country music. The song “The Highwayman” was written by American songwriter Jimmy Webb. When The Highwaymen recorded this song in 1986, it awarded Jimmy Webb a Grammy. You can find the lyrics here.

Thank you, Jim. This was a fun challenge for me this week.


Song Lyric Sunday is hosted every Sunday by Jim Adams. If you would like to join in the fun, check out his blog for the rules and to take in all the other music posted by other bloggers.

SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – 96 Tears

The first SLS prompt of the New Year from Jim is:

This week the theme is to find Garage Rock songs.


I don’t know a lot about garage rock. As a matter a few bands I thought were garage bands did not seem to be described that way so this is a case of what do I know? I did want to pick a song I knew, so I at least felt connected with it in some way.

“96 Tears” is a song by the band ? & The Mysterians. The band was comprised of children of migrant farmers who settled in the Saginaw Valley in Michigan. Question Mark (?) was the stage name of Rudy Martinez, a rather eccentric individual who originally wanted to stay anonymous. The band is often considered a one hit wonder even though five of their songs charted. “96 Tears” was however their only #1 hit.

The driving keyboards are prominent in this song and provided by Frank Rodriguez. The gravelly vocals are performed by Rudy Martinez.

Texas based Pa-Go-Go records originally pressed 500 copies of the record for distribution to local radio stations. “96 Tears” was originally considered the B side, with the A side being “Midnight Hour”.  At Rudy’s insistence “96 Tears” was eventually released as the A side.

In 2004, “96 Tears” was listed as #210 on Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

96 Tears
? & The Mysterians

Lyrics from Songfacts.com

Too many teardrops for one heart to be crying
Too many teardrops for one heart to carry on

You’re way on top now since you left me
You’re always laughing way down at me
But watch out now, I’m gonna get there
We’ll be together for just a little while
And then I’m gonna put you way down here
And you’ll start crying ninety-six tears
Cry, cry

And when the sun comes up, I’ll be on top
You’ll be right down there, looking up
And I might wave, come up here
But I don’t see you waving now
I’m way down here, wondering how
I’m gonna get you but I know now
I’ll just cry, cry, I’ll just cry

Too many teardrops for one heart to be crying
Too many teardrops for one heart to carry on

You’re gonna cry ninety-six tears
You’re gonna cry ninety-six tears
You’re gonna cry, cry, cry, cry now
You’re gonna cry, cry, cry, cry
Ninety-six tears

Come on and let me hear you cry, now
Ninety-six tears, woo
I wanna hear you cry
Night and day, yeah, all night long

Uh, ninety-six tears, cry, cry, cry
Come on, baby, let me hear you cry now, all night long
Uh, ninety-six tears, yeah, come on now
Uh, ninety-six tears

Writer/s: Rudy Martinez
Publisher: Abkco Music Inc.


Song Lyric Sunday is hosted every Sunday by Jim Adams. If you would like to join in the fun, check out his blog for the rules and to take in all the other music posted by other bloggers.

SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – The Rain, The Park, and Other Things

The prompt from Jim:

This week the theme is songs that mention rain.


“The Rain, The Park And Other Things” was written by Artie Kornfeld and Steve Dubofin specifically for The Cowsills, an American family band.

This song is one of a few songs that does not include the title of the song in the lyrics. The song is sometimes known as “The Flower Girl” which was the original title.

According to Kornfield, the record executives were rushing to press the recording but did not want the song to be confused with Scott McKenzie’s success with “San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)”. The title came to Kornfield out of mid-air but he would later say he felt it was a premonition of what was to come concerning Woodstock and the later deaths of his wife and daughter.

In 1969, after writing 75 Billboard hits, Kornfield left Capital Records to go on and co-create the Woodstock Music & Arts Festival with Michael Lang.

“The Rain, The Park And Other Things” was recorded and released in 1967. The instrumentation was provided by session musicians although the family could play their own instruments, which they would go on to do in live performances. The song reached #2 in the Billboard Charts and has sold over 3 million copies worldwide.

Interesting note – the sound of the rain in the intro was actually the sound of bacon frying. From Wikipedia:

The Cowsills did not play on their earliest recordings. Studio musicians were brought in to provide the music for this song and many of the earlier singles. For this record, the arranger was Jimmy Wisner, musicians included Gene Bianco on harp, Vinnie Bell, Charles Macy and Al Gorgoni on guitar, Joe Macho on bass, Artie Butler on organ, Paul Griffin on piano, George Devens on percussion, and Buddy Saltzman and Al Rogers on drums.

Kornfeld had planned to use the sound of a rainstorm as the song’s intro, but recordings of real rain proved to be too faint to hear on record; instead he used a stock sound of sizzling bacon to emulate rain.

The Rain, The Park And Other Things
Lyrics from songfacts.com

I saw her sitting in the rain
Raindrops falling on her
She didn’t seem to care
She sat there and smiled at meThen I knew
She could make me happy
Flowers in her hair
Flowers everywhereI love the flower girl
Oh, I don’t know just why, she simply caught my eye
I love the flower girl
She seemed so sweet and kind, she crept into my mindTo my mindI knew I had to say hello
She smiled up at me
And she took my hand
And we walked through the park aloneAnd I knew
She had made me happy
Flowers in her hair
Flowers everywhere

I love the flower girl
Oh, I don’t know just why, she simply caught my eye
I love the flower girl
She seemed so sweet and kind, she crept into my mind

To my mind

Suddenly, the sun broke through
I turned around, she was gone
All I had left
Was one little flower in my hand

But I knew
She had made me happy
Flowers in her hair
Flowers everywhere

I love the flower girl
Was she reality or just a dream to me?
I love the flower girl
Her love showed me the way to find a sunny day

Sunny day

I love the flower girl
Was she reality or just a dream to me?
I love the flower girl


Song Lyric Sunday is hosted every Sunday by Jim Adams. If you would like to join in the fun, check out his blog for the rules and to take in all the other music posted by other bloggers.

SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – Callin’ Baton Rouge

The prompt from Jim:

This week the theme is songs that feature lyrics associated with electronic communication devices (pagers, iPhone, Android, fax machine, computer, TV).


“Callin’ Baton Rouge” is a country song written by Dennis Linde and first recorded by The Oak Ridge Boys in 1978. The song was later recorded by New Grass Revial in 1989 but it only reached #37 on the charts.

Garth Brooks always liked the song and felt like it was a bit overlooked on the charts. He pulled several prior members of the New Grass Revival back into the studio to record the song with him.

Brooks’ version of the song was a more upbeat rock country arrangement. It was released on his album “In Pieces” in 1998 and reached #2 on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart.

The song tells the story of presumably a truck driver who met a woman in Baton Rouge, LA. Once back on the road, he stops every few hundred miles and tries to call her.

This song has become a bit of a theme song in Louisiana. It is played in the stadium for LSU Tiger games and is also played by college bars in Baton Rouge at “last call”.

“Callin’ Baton Rouge”
Lyrics from songfacts.com

I spent last night in the arms of a girl in Louisiana
And though I’m out on the highway, my thoughts are still with her
Such a strange combination of a woman and a child
Such a strange situation stoppin’ every hundred miles
Callin’ Baton Rouge

A replay of last night’s events roll through my mind
Except a scene or two erased by sweet red wine
And I see a truck stop sign ahead, so I change lanes
I need a cup of coffee and a couple dollars change
Callin’ Baton Rouge

Operator, won’t you put me on through
I gotta send my love down to Baton Rouge
Hurry up, won’t you put her on the line
I gotta talk to the girl just one more time

Hello, Samantha dear, I hope you’re feelin’ fine
And it won’t be long until I’m with you all the time
But until then, I’ll spend my money up right down to my last dime
Callin’ Baton Rouge

Operator, won’t you put me on through
I gotta send my love down to Baton Rouge
Hurry up, won’t you put her on the line
I gotta talk to the girl just one more time
Callin’ Baton Rouge

Sweet Baton Rouge
My Baton Rouge, oh oh ohWriter/s: DENNIS LINDE
Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind


Song Lyric Sunday is hosted every Sunday by Jim Adams. If you would like to join in the fun, check out his blog for the rules and to take in all the other music posted by other bloggers.