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One Liner Wednesday – Turn It Up

Music is what feelings sound like

One Liner Wednesday is brought to us each week by Linda Hill. Pop over to her place to get the rules and read the contribution of others.

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Throwback Thursday #37 – Discovering Your Musical Taste

A to Z is complete, so it is time to get back to our normal routine. This week we delve into the music of our lives. This should be one that everyone relates to in one way or another.

If you care to join us, it’s easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Discovering Your Musical Taste

Let’s explore the music you were exposed to as a child and how you moved from those early experiences into developing a taste of your own.

You can respond to the following questions as they are, or you can use them to spark your own memories and write your own post.

  1. What music were you exposed to in your family home – genre, artist, or style.
  2. Did you enjoy that type of music or did you rebel against it?
  3. How did you listen to music in your childhood home? Radio? Record player? Television?
  4. Did you buy records, tapes, cassettes, 8-tracks or CDs?
  5. What performers were you drawn to most as an adolescent?
  6. Who did you go to see for your first concert? Who did you go with?
  7. What concert has been your favorite concert to date?
  8. When do you listen to music? In the car? At work? While studying or doing projects?
  9. Did the music you listened to affect your attitudes, way of dress, or view of the world?
  10. How has your choice of music changed over the years? What is your genre of choice at this phase of your life?
  11. Bonus Question: What band or group posters did you have hanging in your room? Extra extra bonus points if you can share a copy of it or a link to it.
  12. EXTRA EXTRA BONUS: Care to share a playlist from Spotify?

My post follows.


I don’t usually answer the questions, but I think I will break from tradition and do just that this week.

  1. What music were you exposed to in your family home – genre, artist, or style.
    • I grew up with my grandmother singing hymns while she worked. There was also Lawrence Welk, Sing Along with Mitch, and some bluegrass radio stations. My grandmother had a Victrola and had several 38 rpm records from the 30s and 40s.
  2. Did you enjoy that type of music or did you rebel against it?
    • I enjoyed the music. I was not a big fan of Lawrence Welk but I loved Sing Along with Mitch. Later, my parents had albums of Readers Digest records which I loved listening to. I was too young to rebel.
  3. How did you listen to music in your childhood home? Radio? Record player? Television?
    • As my older siblings aged, we eventually had record players. Radio music was limited because of our location. There were only one or two television stations, so that was limited too.
  4. Did you buy records, tapes, cassettes, 8-tracks or CDs?
    • As I got older, I bought 45s occasionally. Albums did not come until high school. My Dad bought 8-tracks and eventually I bought cassettes and cassette singles – remember those?
  5. What performers were you drawn to most as an adolescent?
    • I listened to a lot of my sisters’ music from the 50s. I grew up with Booby Vee, Bobby Vinton, Bobby Rydell, The Everly Brothers and others from that era. We had all their 45s. I loved early Sonny and Cher. I even wrote Cher a letter once. High school brought the music from the 70s.
  6. Who did you go to see for your first concert? Who did you go with?
    • When I lived in Ohio, we often went to Blossom Music Center to we some alternative bands. I cannot remember any of the band names, however. My first real concert was The Guess Who. The concert was at Kent State, and I went with a guy I knew from Civil Air Patrol named Steve. His Dad was a cop on campus and he drove us to the concert. This would have been the year before the shootings at Kent State.
  7. What concert has been your favorite concert to date?
    • I loved the Pointer Sisters. It was a small venue in Anchorage, Alaska. We all stood and danced and it was high energy and great fun.  But my favorite concert by far was when I saw The Highwaymen in Augusta, Maine. I cried when Johnny Cash sang “I Still Miss Someone”. I saw some legends that night.
  8. When do you listen to music? In the car? At work? While studying or doing projects?
    • I listen to music when I am cooking, doing housework or in the car mostly. In the car it is standard FM radio. At home, I usually stream Sirius XM or Pandora or Spotify. At night I stream some YouTube relaxation music to help me fall asleep. I cannot listen to music while writing or doing art unless it is classical. I love words and find them distracting if I am trying to concentrate on something else.
  9. Did the music you listened to affect your attitudes, way of dress, or view of the world?
    • I always cared about lyrics and in that way, the music helped me understand the broader world. I was a bit of a hippie child in the 70s and dressed accordingly. I was all about bell bottoms, paisley, peasant blouses, and long straight hair parted in the center.
  10. How has your choice of music changed over the years? What is your genre of choice at this phase of your life?
    • I have a deep appreciation for most music. I still love country, “oldies” from my generation, classical, jazz, Yacht Rock, standards, Beatles, Doobie Brothers, Indigo Girls, big band and  bluegrass. Some bluegrass grates on my nerves, but I appreciate the classics. I prefer a mix of music instead of all one genre when I listen. I love making playlists for that reason.
  11. Bonus Question: What band posters did you have hanging in your room? Extra extra bonus points if you can share a copy of it or a link to it.
    • Cher, The Monkees, the Association. In the Air Force I had one Chicago poster (from Live at Carnegie Hall) you can see here.
  12. EXTRA EXTRA BONUS: Care to share a playlist from Spotify? Sure. How about my “Gotta Move” playlist?
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One Liner Wednesday and #JusJoJan – Canned Music

I spend so little time out these days. I had a rare few minutes in the grocery store and was delighted to hear some favorite songs playing in the background. Who needs concerts when we have the grocery store?

Woman leaning over cart in grocery store
Am I getting old or is the grocery store playing great music these days?

 

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Throwback Thursday – Music Memories


Welcome back to Throwback Thursday Memory Blog Hop. Lauren and I rotate publishing this challenge every Thursday.

Participation is easy. Write your own post about the subject and share your own memories or experience about the topic and leave a pingback to this post in the comments. You can use the photo above in your post and tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen to make it easier for others to find.

If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below!

Music Memories

Maybe it’s a song that brings back good memories. Maybe it was your first radio or record player – or iPod depending on your age. Maybe it is the song that always moves you to tears. What song was played at your wedding? Did you have band posters hanging on your bedroom walls? What are your music-connected memories?

My post follows below.


In our house someone was always singing. My grandmother sang hymns as she did her housework. The song I remember her singing was “Peace in the Valley”. I realized early on how comforting music could be.

My grandfather sang old songs like “Old Dan Tucker”. As a little girl I remember him telling me a story about a man killed in a crane accident when they worked building bridges for the railroad. I think my grandfather was operating the crane and it devastated him. I never knew the man’s name, but my grandfather said he always sang “My Blue Heaven”. I somehow felt a sort of responsibility to always remember him by remembering that song. He has lived through my memories all these sixty odd years and I never knew his name.

My grandparents had a Victrola in the bedroom upstairs. It was built into a dark wood cabinet with a felt covered turntable and a removable crank on the side. There was a circular metal tray to store spare needles. I loved to hear the crackling sound of the needle moving across the record. I can close my eyes and still picture it in great detail.

When I was about six or seven, my grandmother was upstairs listening to 78 rpm records on the Victrola. I came running into the room, bounced up on the bed and broke one of my grandmother’s records. That was the first time I had ever seen my grandmother cry. I was devastated. The record was “I’ll Take You Home Again Kathleen”. I could not tell you who recorded it, but I realized just how much a single piece of music could mean to someone.

I grew up listening to and loving the music of my parents’ era but they were also about newer music, too. They would put Chubby Checker records on and we would all do the twist in the living room. “The Peppermint Twist” and “Let’s Twist Again” were favorites. It was so much fun.

We listened to a lot of records. My siblings and I had 45’s strewn all over the house. We didn’t buy albums until much later. My sisters were the right age to go crazy over the Beatles and Elvis. I listened to all the music of my siblings and learned to love it all. As time progressed, I was a big fan of The Monkees, The Beach Boys, The Association, the Guess Who, Simon and Garfunkle, and Cat Stevens.

I didn’t have a lot of posters on my bedroom walls, but when I joined the Air Force, I had the huge Chicago at Carnegie Hall poster on my wall along with lots of black light posters. I had a huge collection of albums at that time.

Eventually cassettes and 8-tracks took over and now almost everything is digital. We’ve come a long way from the 78 records my grandmother loved so much. Regardless of how the music is presented, it is woven into every fiber of my being. Music has accompanied every important moment of my life and all it takes is just a few seconds of the right song to take me back to another place and another time. That’s a special kind of magic.