Blog, throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday #38 – Medical Care


Welcome back to Throwback Thursday. Lauren is hosting this week and asking about early visits to doctors and dentists!  Head over to her blog to get the details, and then join in!

This week’s prompt is: Doctors and Dentists

My post follows.


Back to answering the questions Lauren posed.

1) Where doctor/dentist appointments a regular part of your childhood?
 
We rarely went to the doctor or the dentist. Most of our care consisted of home remedies. My aunt was a nurse and she always gave us shots of some kind. We had regular doses of cod liver oil followed by a small piece of maple sugar broken off a piece that was hard as a rock.

2) Did you go for well-checks or just when you were ill or in pain?

Only if ill or in pain. Being rural we did have a rescue squad you could call for dire emergencies.

3) Were you frightened by the medical professionals? If so, were there specific reasons?

Not of doctors. All my dental visits seemed to involve pain so I was not a big fan of dentists.

4) Were your parents afraid of medical professionals?

No.

5) Was waiting in the exam room stressful to you?

Not unless I had worried myself into a tizzy thinking I had some deadly disease or illness. I was good as long as there was an unspoiled copy of Highlights magazine to read. 

6) Did your early visits result in your being afraid of needles?

No. My grandmother was a nurse and I was fascinated by her needles.

7) Does the sight of your own blood bother you?

Nope.

8) Did you ever have the need to go to an emergency room?

My parents were taking me once for a bad nosebleed, but as we pulled into town, the bleeding stopped so I never went in. I was in the hospital once as a child for some gastrointestinal thing. All I remember about it was I was high up and had to wave at my siblings on the street below. And also, they wrote on my arm with a purple pen.

9) Did your early experiences impact your current attitudes about medical care?

No. I think care was better then at least from the perspective of being able to find a doctor and see them quickly.

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Throwback Thursday #37 – Discovering Your Musical Taste

A to Z is complete, so it is time to get back to our normal routine. This week we delve into the music of our lives. This should be one that everyone relates to in one way or another.

If you care to join us, it’s easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Discovering Your Musical Taste

Let’s explore the music you were exposed to as a child and how you moved from those early experiences into developing a taste of your own.

You can respond to the following questions as they are, or you can use them to spark your own memories and write your own post.

  1. What music were you exposed to in your family home – genre, artist, or style.
  2. Did you enjoy that type of music or did you rebel against it?
  3. How did you listen to music in your childhood home? Radio? Record player? Television?
  4. Did you buy records, tapes, cassettes, 8-tracks or CDs?
  5. What performers were you drawn to most as an adolescent?
  6. Who did you go to see for your first concert? Who did you go with?
  7. What concert has been your favorite concert to date?
  8. When do you listen to music? In the car? At work? While studying or doing projects?
  9. Did the music you listened to affect your attitudes, way of dress, or view of the world?
  10. How has your choice of music changed over the years? What is your genre of choice at this phase of your life?
  11. Bonus Question: What band or group posters did you have hanging in your room? Extra extra bonus points if you can share a copy of it or a link to it.
  12. EXTRA EXTRA BONUS: Care to share a playlist from Spotify?

My post follows.


I don’t usually answer the questions, but I think I will break from tradition and do just that this week.

  1. What music were you exposed to in your family home – genre, artist, or style.
    • I grew up with my grandmother singing hymns while she worked. There was also Lawrence Welk, Sing Along with Mitch, and some bluegrass radio stations. My grandmother had a Victrola and had several 38 rpm records from the 30s and 40s.
  2. Did you enjoy that type of music or did you rebel against it?
    • I enjoyed the music. I was not a big fan of Lawrence Welk but I loved Sing Along with Mitch. Later, my parents had albums of Readers Digest records which I loved listening to. I was too young to rebel.
  3. How did you listen to music in your childhood home? Radio? Record player? Television?
    • As my older siblings aged, we eventually had record players. Radio music was limited because of our location. There were only one or two television stations, so that was limited too.
  4. Did you buy records, tapes, cassettes, 8-tracks or CDs?
    • As I got older, I bought 45s occasionally. Albums did not come until high school. My Dad bought 8-tracks and eventually I bought cassettes and cassette singles – remember those?
  5. What performers were you drawn to most as an adolescent?
    • I listened to a lot of my sisters’ music from the 50s. I grew up with Booby Vee, Bobby Vinton, Bobby Rydell, The Everly Brothers and others from that era. We had all their 45s. I loved early Sonny and Cher. I even wrote Cher a letter once. High school brought the music from the 70s.
  6. Who did you go to see for your first concert? Who did you go with?
    • When I lived in Ohio, we often went to Blossom Music Center to we some alternative bands. I cannot remember any of the band names, however. My first real concert was The Guess Who. The concert was at Kent State, and I went with a guy I knew from Civil Air Patrol named Steve. His Dad was a cop on campus and he drove us to the concert. This would have been the year before the shootings at Kent State.
  7. What concert has been your favorite concert to date?
    • I loved the Pointer Sisters. It was a small venue in Anchorage, Alaska. We all stood and danced and it was high energy and great fun.  But my favorite concert by far was when I saw The Highwaymen in Augusta, Maine. I cried when Johnny Cash sang “I Still Miss Someone”. I saw some legends that night.
  8. When do you listen to music? In the car? At work? While studying or doing projects?
    • I listen to music when I am cooking, doing housework or in the car mostly. In the car it is standard FM radio. At home, I usually stream Sirius XM or Pandora or Spotify. At night I stream some YouTube relaxation music to help me fall asleep. I cannot listen to music while writing or doing art unless it is classical. I love words and find them distracting if I am trying to concentrate on something else.
  9. Did the music you listened to affect your attitudes, way of dress, or view of the world?
    • I always cared about lyrics and in that way, the music helped me understand the broader world. I was a bit of a hippie child in the 70s and dressed accordingly. I was all about bell bottoms, paisley, peasant blouses, and long straight hair parted in the center.
  10. How has your choice of music changed over the years? What is your genre of choice at this phase of your life?
    • I have a deep appreciation for most music. I still love country, “oldies” from my generation, classical, jazz, Yacht Rock, standards, Beatles, Doobie Brothers, Indigo Girls, big band and  bluegrass. Some bluegrass grates on my nerves, but I appreciate the classics. I prefer a mix of music instead of all one genre when I listen. I love making playlists for that reason.
  11. Bonus Question: What band posters did you have hanging in your room? Extra extra bonus points if you can share a copy of it or a link to it.
    • Cher, The Monkees, the Association. In the Air Force I had one Chicago poster (from Live at Carnegie Hall) you can see here.
  12. EXTRA EXTRA BONUS: Care to share a playlist from Spotify? Sure. How about my “Gotta Move” playlist?
Blog, throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday #36 – Not Missing You at All!


Welcome back to Throwback Thursday. Lauren is hosting this week and asking about those things we do not miss!  Head over to her blog to get the details, and then join in!

This week’s prompt is: Things I Don’t Miss

My post follows.


I decided to simply list a few things if you can relate to any of them, drop me a comment. Or let me know what comes to mind when you read this topic.

  • Garter belts
  • Panty hose that we’re not long enough
  • Nail Polish to stop runs in my nylons
  • cod liver oil
  • Spankings (our parents paddled our behinds)
  • Hot summers with no A/C
  • Corn meal mush
  • Peeling peaches
  • New school shoes
  • Wearing dresses to school
  • Pixie haircuts
  • picking beans
  • Static forming slips
  • Cleaning my plate under the guise of starving children somewhere
  • Frozen lima beans
  • Four kids shoved into the backseat
  • Stinging nettle
  • High school algebra
  • Blistering sunburns
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Throwback Thursday #35 – Going, Going, Gone

I’m back! Another easy one this week so let’s get started.

If you care to join us, it’s easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Things I Miss

This week think about objects or places you miss having in your life. It could be a favorite toy, a photograph, a favorite hang-out, a favorite store or shop, a collectible, a favorite pair of jeans, or old movie ticket stubs. It can be anything your little heart desires. Write about one thing or write about a few. You’re running the show this week!

My post follows:


To me, some memories are best in our minds. Take clothes for instance. I had some great clothes, but I was a toothpick then! Having them in front of me might be depressing!

There are a few things I wish I still had Or things I miss and together they are quite an eclectic mix.

  1. My grandmother was a nurse and she had a few glass hypodermic needles each in their own cardboard box. I wish I had them. They were objects of fascination for me as a child.
  2. Then there was my collection of broken glass. I spent months wading the creeks, picking up beautiful pieces of glass smoothed by tumbling over the rocks for miles and miles. I kept them in the cardboard box my Barbie came in.
  3. There was a drive-up burger place called the Hi-Lo burger. Our parents took us there often. Later in life I went there with my Dad and my children. The building was still standing, but it has been closed for years. They had THE best burgers and I had the best memories.
  4. I wish I still had my class ring. It was from Jostens of course – white gold with a hematite stone with my initials inside. Stupidly, I gave it to my ex-husband who in turn gave it to his girlfriend telling her it was his. Obviously with my initials inside, neither of them were too bright.

I must stop now before I ramble on and on. I look forward to your posts!

Blog, throwback thursday

Throwback Thursday #34 – Learning to Swim


Welcome back to Throwback Thursday. Lauren is hosting again this week and hopefully I will be back next Thursday. Head over to her blog to get the details, and then join in!

This week’s prompt is: Learning to Swim

My post follows.


My first attempt at learning to swim was a bit traumatic and it affects me to this day in the way I feel about bodies of water.

Growing up in the country we all spent a lot of time in and around the creeks and creek beds. The water was mostly gentle and easy to wade as there were few deep spots to worry about. Our biggest worries were likely snakes and the very slick moss covered rocks we knew not to step on else we would end up flat on our back in the middle of the creek.

There were deep pools of water at some places, though – the two largest being the baptizing hole and the mill pond. My grandfather would take me to the baptizing hole to splash around and get wet all while under his watchful eye. No one liked to swim much in the baptizing hole because it was shaded and the mountain streams stayed very cold. Not to mention the hogmollies that loved to linger in the currents.

When I got old enough to go to the mill pond with the bigger kids, it was a whole new experience. Getting there required a trip up the railroad track to the holler. Then there was a narrow winding  path barely accessible but very well traveled in the brush that lead to the creek. The path opened out to a rocky beach area and a deep pool of water we knew as the mill pond.

I am guessing the distance from the shore to the cliff that jutted out from the hillside was only 15 to 20 ft. Once you swam across the deep pool in the middle, the reward was sitting on the cliff under the water, basking in the warmth of the sun.

We were a small community where everyone knew each other, but that did not mean we didn’t have a few bad eggs. I was probably seven years old or so when I got brave enough to finally dog paddle my way to the cliff. As I got right around the deepest part of the creek, the community bully was seated on the cliff and he started splashing huge amounts of water in my face. I could not see, or breathe and I panicked. Thankfully I kept paddling until I could feel my hands brush against the cliff. The bully took off and I sat on that cliff shivering trying to decide how I would ever get up the nerve to try to swim back across. Obviously I made it, but don’t ask me how.

Years would pass with many opportunities to swim but I never felt comfortable in the water. My father loved to put us on his shoulders and ‘jump the waves’ in the ocean which also terrified me! I went to my friends’ houses with pools and splashed around, but relied on looking good in my bathing suit to keep me out of the water.

When hubby and I bought our first house, it had a really large pool. Hubby had been a lifeguard for years and he taught me to swim at the ripe old age of 42. I could dive and I even helped my niece learn to swim. We had years and years of fun in our pools in Florida. I was thankful I finally felt comfortable in the water.

I am still not comfortable with boundless pools of water like lakes and oceans. I like to know my boundaries and then I am usually okay.