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Throwback Thursday #57 – Slang


Lauren’s back this week but after reading her post I fear that I may flip my noodle!  Head over to her blog to see what she has in store for us.

This week’s prompt is: Slang


My youth spanned three decades and my memory of slang and phrases are a mish mash of all three.

I remember my parents demonstrating how beatniks danced. Remember beatniks? They were bad news in some circles. You dig? I heard they would split the scene if the fuzz was nearby.

Sometimes people were a drag to be around. They were just bad news. The cool kids would hang out in their pad wearing the latest threads until it was time to beat feet and head home.

My gang just liked to hang out, and be mellow. Things were groovy as long as there were no drags bringing you down. Girls looking sharp in their peasant blouses and bell bottoms. Guys wearing paisley shirts trying to convince a chick to go to the submarine races. More than a few people walked around sporting a hickey on their neck. Sometimes that situation could get a little hairy.

We all thought we were out of sight. Even the dorks thought so. But back in the day that was totally copacetic. Life was chill and everything was boss (with a fist showing a thumbs up 👍🏼)

We were too cool for school.

That’s it for me. Catch you on the flip side.

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Throwback Thursday #56 – Is it Better to Have Loved and Lost?


Remember those first loves and the rush that went along with the first kiss? With those first loves usually come some of our earliest heartbreaks.

This week’s prompt is: First Heartbreak

I will give you some questions to help you along. Or, free write if you would rather. You can either respond in the comments or link back to this post. My response will follow.


How old were you when you had your first heartbreak? (For some it might be well into adulthood and that’s fine, too!)

Who broke your heart – first names only?

Do you remember how the breakup happened?

Did you have a ring or token of your love? Did you return it?

Did you think this was true love?

Did you play any sad songs to soothe the pain? If so, do you remember the name of the song?

If you were an adolescent, were your parents sympathetic or were they of the “it’s only puppy love” school of thought?

How long did it take you to get over it all?

Do you remember this person fondly or is it someone you prefer to forget?

After all was said and done, was it for the best or did you remain longing for a love lost?


My first real heartbreak was when I was 17 years-old. My sister was in the Air Force and stationed in. Charleston, SC. Over the summer, my parents and I traveled to Charleston to see her. Over the weekend, we drove out to Isle of Palms to stay for the weekend. I remember it well. We stayed in a huge old white three story house with lots of bedrooms. It was an early mix between a boarding house and what would become what we now know as a bed and breakfast.

My sister invited some of her Air Force friends out to spend the day at the beach with us. There were three guys if I remember correctly. I have a perfect mental image of myself at the time. Young, thin, with long brown hair. I remember wearing shorts and a halter top and a wide brimmed hat. We spent the day dividing our time between the ocean and the beach.

As the day went on, I found myself falling for this tall, dark, young Italian man named Pete. By the end of the day I was head over heels. We walked to the boardwalk and there I experienced my very first ‘adult’ kiss. I felt like I might die right then and there. I was smitten. As the afternoon faded everyone decided to shower and change so we could all go out to dinner, sans parents.

My mom was quite the character and always had an edgy sense of humor. We were all sitting on the sprawling porch when my sister’s friends pulled up, got out of the car and approached us. At first my mom did not recognize them now that they had showered and changed out of their swim trunks. When she finally recognized who they were, she laughed and said, “Sorry. I didn’t recognize you with your clothes on.” Everyone laughed except a couple of very prim and proper ladies sitting on the porch.

We all piled in the car and drove to what I think was a Shakey’s pizza parlor. On the ride back, I sat by Pete. I was overwhelmed  with feelings I had never experienced. That evening, back at the beach, we sat on the steps and he sang to me – “Tell Laura I Love Her” is the song I remember most. What a wonderful voice he had. We sat on those steps as night fell and the stars came out – then he had to go.

We left the following day and went to my grandparents’ home in Virginia. When we arrived I had a terrible sunburn. I was blistered, but all I could think about was Pete. My sunburn was so bad my grandmother had me lie on the bed upstairs. She brewed strong tea, cooled it, and soaked towels in the tea to use as compresses on my back. I laid on the bed all day and cried my eyes out. Everyone thought it was the sunburn, but it wasn’t. It was a broken heart.

I never saw Pete again, but I did talk to him years later when I was in the Air Force. The Air Force had a personnel locator service so people could find each other after they were separated by a change in duty stations. I managed to get his phone number and called him. I can remember the conversation as if it were yesterday. He was shocked to hear from me. He was touched and surprised that I called and was truly surprised to learn how I felt about him a just few years earlier.

Years later I am glad it was what it was and we never saw each other again, but I definitely did not feel that way then. It will always remains a beautiful unblemished memory of my first ‘real’ love and the pain of my first crushing heartbreak.


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Throwback Thursday #55 – Times of Chaos and Crisis


Welcome back to Throwback Thursday. “Oh, my fur and whiskers! I’m late.” Lauren has us thinking about our reactions in times of crisis and chaos. Head over to her blog to see what she has in store for us.

This week’s prompt is: Dealing With a Crisis


I have had a very busy week, so I’m going to answer the questions Lauren posed.

How well did you deal with a crisis in your youth or as a young adult?

Our little community was filled with multigenerational families. As a result, I experienced a lot of death as a child. My brother and I found our own grandfather lying peacefully on the hillside where he died from a heart attack. I don’t remember any specific effort to explain or comfort my brother and I. I did, however have two very vivid dreams where my grandfather came to me and explained what it was like to be dead. I was only 10 years old and I still remember every detail of those dreams.

Were you involved with a sudden disruption to your normal life that resulted in stress?

We had two moves as a family. One from Virginia to Florida, and one from Virginia to Ohio. I think because I had a brother and two sisters, I didn’t feel alone. We were all raised to roll with the punches I suppose. The adjustment to Ohio was a little more challenging since I was older. I don’t think I felt it was stressful, though.

Were you the worry wart or did you let things roll off our sleeves?

We were all taught to let things roll off our back. But I was a bit of a worrier. Not about everyday things, but more about big things like contemplating the expanse of the universe, and dying. I think I grew up with an unusual fear of death.

Did you follow the example of your parents?

Not sure how to answer this other than to say I think our coping skills were what we learned by watching our parents cope. I parented much differently – my children probably got tired of me urging them to talk.

Were you able to discuss your fears and worries openly, or did you keep your concerns to yourself?

I never told anyone about the deep and intense thoughts I had. I remember one night I was overwhelmed thinking about the idea of infinity. I went downstairs crying and told my grandmother my throat hurt. I did not want to be alone. I think she was a worrier, too. She thought sure I had scarlet fever although I had no symptoms whatsoever.

Did you have a good support system to deal with your worries?

I kept most to myself.

Do you, as an adult, still respond the same ways?

I can worry, but I have learned better coping skills as an adult.

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Throwback Thursday #54 – Raindrops on Roses


Welcome back to Throwback Thursday. Lauren had us dressed to the nines last week, so I thought this week we could be a little more casual and relaxed. I thought it would be fun to remember our adolescence and just think about a few of our favorite things.

This week’s prompt is: Favorite Things

Pick any period of your adolescence and think back to all your favorite things. Feel free to elaborate as much as you want.


Who was your favorite relative? Not to play favorites, but who was the person you connected with more than others? Aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent, or parent? Why were you closest to them?

What was your favorite TV show? Share a clip if you can find one.

What was your favorite book or favorite family story?

What was your favorite, song, record, or album. Feel free to share a YouTube video of it.

Who was your favorite teacher? What grade were you in and what subject did they teach?

What was your favorite subject (not teacher) in school?

Who was your favorite (aka best) friend? What things did you do together?

What was your favorite way to pass the time?

What was your favorite holiday? How did you celebrate?

What was your favorite toy or possession? Doll, camera, radio, bicycle?

Bonus: What was your favorite adventure? Family trip, amusement park, field trip, or vacation perhaps.


Who was your favorite relative? Not to play favorites, but who was the person you connected with more than others? Aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent, or parent? Why were you closest to them?

I had a lot of cousins, but I was not terribly close to any of them. I attribute that to the fact that no one in my mother’s nuclear family were very emotional, bordering on being a little cold I think. I was the closest to my paternal grandfather. He was my best friend until he passed away. He was my ‘gentle giant’. I learned so much about life and how to treat people just being in his presence. I still miss him terribly.

What was your favorite TV show? Share a clip if you can find one.

I loved the show “Where the Action Is”. It made me dream of living near the beach in California where all the cool teens were.

What was your favorite book or favorite family story?

I was always enthralled with stories about my family. My maternal grandparents spent years teaching agriculture in the Philippines, my paternal grandfather built railroad bridges all over the southeastern US, my paternal grandmother lost her mother at a very young age and ended up raising her siblings. I thought their lives were so interesting – it was hard to beat those stories.

What was your favorite, song, record, or album. Feel free to share a YouTube video of it.

“Spirit in the Sky” by Norman Greenbaum was and still is one of my favorite songs.

Who was your favorite teacher? What grade were you in and what subject did they teach?

I had several great and favorite teachers. My first grade teacher was Miss B. She was kind and gentle. I kept in touch with her for years, and she was always so sweet to me. My seventh grade art teacher was Mrs. M. She was progressive and fun and drove a corvette for crying out loud! Then there was Mrs. M (a different Mrs. M) who was my high school English teacher. Another kind and intelligent woman who would help me visualize the kind of person I wanted to be.

What was your favorite subject (not teacher) in school?

Art, band, and English were always where I felt creative and felt I excelled. They were my safe places.

Who was your favorite (aka best) friend? What things did you do together?

My best friend in high school was Cindy. She lived down the street from me and we hung out all the time. We were in the same class and graduated together. We lost touch when I joined the Air Force. Through Classmates, I got back in touch with her a few years ago. We communicated for a while and then she dropped off the radar again.

What was your favorite way to pass the time?

I joined the band. It occupied most of my time. Concert band was in the winter, and marching band in football season and all summer long. In the marching band I was in the color guard, in the concert band I played flute. All my other spare time was spent attending Civil Air Patrol meetings and events.

What was your favorite holiday? How did you celebrate?

It was always Christmas and it is still Christmas. A big tree, family, lots to eat, and SO much love.

What was your favorite toy or possession? Doll, camera, radio, bicycle?

Wow. I struggled answering this. I am realizing I was not attached to any things – maybe because I did not have a lot possessions. Even now, the few things I treasure were things that belonged to my parents or grandparents.

Bonus: What was your favorite adventure? Family trip, amusement park, field trip, or vacation perhaps.

We never took family vacations. I think my favorite memories are all the summer band trips we took. Canada, Virginia Beach, and opening day at Cedar Point amusement park every summer.

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Throwback Thursday #53 – It’s A Formal Affair


Welcome back to Throwback Thursday.  Head over to Lauren’s blog to see what she has in store for us.

This week’s prompt is: It’s a Formal Affair


In the country, there were not many occasions to dress formally. We all had “Sunday go-to-meetin clothes” which were the clothes we wore to church on Sundays.  But when Easter rolled around, we all got fancy clothes. For girls, that usually meant spring colors, patent leather shoes, new white socks with lace around the top, and on the rare occasion, an Easter bonnet!

Family photo
Easter Morning with my grandparents. Mom is holding me. My sisters dressed alike although they were not twins! My brother in a suit coat.

I will say that the high schools did have beauty pageants. Almost all the girls participated. It was a chance to get all gussied up and wear a formal gown, including elbow length white gloves. Both my sisters were in beauty pageants, but we moved before I was in high school. I cannot imagine myself participating.

I wrote a post about my first occasion to wear a formal gown. I went to a DeMolay dance with my boyfriend. It was a sweet memory to write about and I went into great detail about the dress I wore. If you are a sucker for a story about young love, you might enjoy reading it – just follow this link.

The second time I wore a formal gown was when I attended my senior prom. I have a photo somewhere, but it is hideous. I had a new boyfriend by this time. My girlfriend and I decided to go to a salon and have our hair done. Marilyn had short hair and she had it curled with daisies nestled into each curl. I had long, board-straight hair so there was no way it was going to hold curl. The top half of my hair was put up on my head, teased within an inch of its life. (Teasing hair is a process where you comb a portion of the hair into the scalp to build volume.) The back portion of my hair was curled in long ringlets. Half way through the night, it was all falling down.

My dress was a long pale green empire waist formal, with a sheer over dress. It was sleeveless but I wore elbow length white gloves. Our high school rented a local country club for the after party. We ended up leaving around 3:00 am and going to a local 24 hour donut shop.

My daughter has photos from my marriage to her father. I wore a long white dress (not a wedding gown) with a bolero jacket with feathers on the sleeves. It was quite feminine and quite beautiful.

When hubby and I got married, I wore a simple long gown – the color was called candlelight. It was actually a pattern dress which cost me next to nothing. I was quite pleased with the find.

We have had several occasions since our marriage to wear formal attire, but that ship has now sailed. You will most likely find me in something very comfortable these days.