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Song Lyric Sunday – What Goes With Pumpkin Pie?

The prompt from Jim this week is to find a song that features one or more of the words: Ghost/Pumpkin/Trick/Treat/Witch.

What goes with Pumpkin Pie?  Apples and Peaches of course! The song I chose today is “Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie” by Jay and the Techniques. The song was recorded in 1967 in New York with Jay Proctor singing lead with Melba Moore, Nick Ashford, and Valerie Simpson providing the background vocals.

Producer Jerry Ross used session musicians for the recording. The band was not used in the studio because Ross felt they did not read music well enough to handle the studio recording.

Please check out The Story Behind: Jay and the Techniques, “Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie” here on Rebeat Magazine. It covers the creation of the group as well as the history behind the song.

Apples, Peaches, Pumpkin Pie
Lyrics from Oldielyrics.com

Ready or not here I come
Gee that used to be such fun

Apples peaches pumpkin pie
Who’s afraid to holler I?
That’s a game we used to play.
Hide and seek was its name.
Oh ready or not, here I come,
Gee that used to be such fun.
I always used to find a hiding place,
Times have changed.
Well I’m one step behind you, but still I can’t find you.
Apple peaches pumpkin pie,
You were young and so was I.
Now that we’ve grown up it seems
You just keep ignoring me.
I’ll find you anywhere you go,
I’ll follow you high and low.
You can’t escape this love of mine anytime.
Well, I’ll sneak up behind you,
Be careful where I find you.
Apple peaches pumpkin pie,
Soon your love will be all mine.
Then I’m gonna take you home,
Marry you so you won’t roam.
Marry you so you won’t roam. Right now
I’ll find you anywhere you go,
I’m gonna look high and low.
You can’t escape this love of mine anytime.
Well, I’ll sneak up behind you,
Be careful where I find you.
Ready or not here I come,
Gee that used to be such fun

[Repeat And Fade]


Why not join in on this Sunday blogging ritual. Head over to Jim Adams’ blog to check out the rules and read some of the great responses to the weekly prompt.

Blog, SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – What? No Rules? Meet My Family, Then!

You know what happens when there are no rules? People run amuck doing whatever they please. Jim certainly let the chickens out of the hen house today! And I am shattering any idea of rules!


I decided today would be a good day to introduce you to my family through music. When I think about them I tried to focus on what song rises to the top in my memories.

Dad was a big man with a deep bass voice. He was a bit of a scoundrel in his early days but he was my best friend, my confidant, my biggest cheerleader. We took a lot of road trips and singing was always a way to pass the time. On long trips everyone would fall asleep except Dad and I. Behind the drivers seat I sat and would rub his shoulders to keep him awake as he drove into the night. This is when he would start singing the spiritual and hymn “Steal Away”. I looked hard to find an arrangement that sounded the most like Dad. This one by McHenry Boatright comes the closest.

Mom always shared her music with me. This is where I learned about Glenn Miller, Ned Miller, and Vaughn Monroe among others. “Racing With the Moon” was Vaughn Monroe’s signature song, highlighting his wonderful baritone voice. Hearing this song makes me think Mom is just in the next room listening to the record player.

Picking a song that reminded me of my sister, BJ, was difficult. She loved all the oldies from her generation. It came down to deciding between Elvis and Ricky Nelson. “Travelin’ Man” won out simply because I can see her popping the 45 on the record player and singing along. Remember watching Ozzie and Harriet and hoping there would be time for Ricky to sing at the end of the show?

My sister Rosie was a huge Paul Revere and the Raiders fan. She attended a Christian college in Tennessee and spent a great deal of time in Cherokee, NC. The outdoor play “Unto These Hills” depicts the pain and suffering that was a result of the Indian Removal Act of 1830, resulting in what is now known  as “The Trail of Tears”. She fought tirelessly for Native American rights. This song is one that always makes me think of her even though it contains some inaccuracies which seem to plague American history.

My brother is another story altogether. For him it was between The Beatles, The Left Banke, and Every Mother’s Son. I pondered “Get Back”, “Pretty Ballerina”, and “Come On Down to My Boat”. He drove me nuts with the first two putting the 45s on and playing them with the arm off. So, the winner today is Every Mother’s Son.


Why not join in on this Sunday blogging ritual. Head over to  Jim Adams blog to check out the rules and read some of the great responses to the weekly prompt.

Blog, SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – Daddy Sang Bass

This week we have a prompt suggested by msjadeli of Tao Talk that goes back to the more normal prompt of Brother/Sibling/Sister.


I wasn’t sure I was going to write this post today. Yesterday was mentally stressful and I did not have the energy to do the research I like to provide, but here is my skeleton version.

I grew up in southwest Virginia. It was very common for people to gather to play music together. People would gather and singalong, or jump in with their own instruments. It is still very much ‘the way’ with country folk. Every instrument from a guitar to a mandolin to a banjo or even a ukulele and someone playing the spoons. All were welcome. If a song was suggested that not everyone knew, the question that was invariably asked was “can you hum a line of it?” And off they would go.

Thus tradition of singing was also present in our family car trips sans instruments. My dad had a deep bass voice which is what brought today’s song to mind.

”Daddy Sang Bass” was written by Carl Perkins and recorded by Johnny Cash in 1968. Both artists attributed their recovery from addiction to finding God.  According to Wikipedia, the line “Me and little brother would join right in there” was written about Johnny Cash’s younger brother Jack who passed away when they were both young boys.

In the original recording, the line of the brothers was sung but uncredited by Don Reid and Lew DeWitt of the Statler Brothers. The line “Mama sang tenor” was sung and uncredited by Jan Howard and not June Carter Cash as some people think. The song would reach #1 in Billboard’s Hot Country Songs.

Daddy Sang Bass
Lyrics from Songfacts.com

I remember when I was a lad
Times were hard and things were bad
But there’s a silver linin’ behind every cloud
Just four people that ‘s all we were
Tryin’ to make a livin’ out of black-land dirt
But we’d get together in a family circle singin’ loud

Daddy sang bass (mama sang tenor)
Me and little brother would join right in there
Singin’ seems to help a troubled soul
One of these days and it won’t be long
I’ll rejoin them in a song
I’m gonna join the family circle at the throne

Though the circle won’t be broken
By and by, Lord, by and by
Daddy sang bass (mama sang tenor)
Me and little brother would join right in there
In the sky, Lord, in the sky

Now I remember after work mama would call in all of us
You could hear us singin’ for a country mile
Now little brother has done gone on
But I’ll rejoin him in a song
We’ll be together again up yonder in a little while

Daddy sang bass (mama sang tenor)
Me and little brother would join right in there
‘Cause singin’ seems to help a troubled soul
One of these days and it won’t be long
I’ll rejoin them in a song
I’m gonna join the family circle at the throne

Oh no the circle won’t be broken
By and by, Lord, by and by
Daddy sang bass (mama sang tenor)
Me and little brother would join right in there
In the sky, Lord, in the sky

In the sky, Lord, in the sky


Why not join in on this Sunday blogging ritual. Head over to  Jim Adams blog to check out the rules and read some of the great responses to the weekly prompt.

Blog, SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – k.d. Lang

This week we have another prompt that is very different, that being using a song that features a Canadian artist or group.


I am still reeling over the death of Justice Ginsburg. I feel profoundly for her family. It must be difficult to grieve the loss when so many people have reverted to their most base desires for power and control. This is the sad statement about living a life in the public eye – your personal life is second.

My thoughts went to k.d. lang, a Canadian artist with a hauntingly beautiful voice. She wrote the song “Constant Craving” with Ben Mink. In an interview with NPR, she said of “Constant Craving”:

It’s an acquiescence. It’s a summation of human desire. It’s like yes, OK, we all are heartbroken. We’re all nervous. We’re all vulnerable. We’re all hopeful, but at the end of the day, constant craving has always been.

This is how I am feeling right now. Listening to this song has given me a sense of peace for yet another circumstance in 2020 that I have no control over.

According to Songfacts k.d. lang said “Constant Craving” is about Shambhala. From Atlanta.Shambhla.org:

Shambhala is about the inherent wisdom, compassion, and courage of all beings, and even of human society- our fundamental nature. We can acknowledge our inherent human dignity, worthiness, completeness and non-faultiness, and have confidence in that. These can be the foundational principles for society. They are the potential for enlightened society. In this tradition enlightened society is not a Utopian state, but it is a society that has enough confidence and trust to acknowledge humanity’s most innate principle: basic goodness.

Sounds like the types of things Justice Ginsburg was passionate about.

k.d.lang came out in 1992. As a result, some radio stations stopped playing her music. (I read there was a protest against her at the 1992 Grammy Awards, but I have had difficulty verifying.) Justice Ginsburg was a champion for LGBTQ rights in this country. She was the first Supreme Court Justice to conduct a same sex marriage. I find parallels here.

Constant Craving
lyrics from Songfacts.com

Even through the darkest phase
Be it thick or thin
Always someone marches brave
Here beneath my skin

Constant craving
Has always been

Maybe a great magnet pulls
All souls towards truth
Or maybe it is life itself
That feeds wisdom
To its youth

Constant craving
Has always been

Craving
Ah ha
Constant craving
Has always been
Has always been

Constant craving
Has always been
Constant craving
Has always been

Craving
Ah ha
Constant craving
Has always been
Has always been
Has always been
Has always been
Has always been
Has always been


Why not join in on this Sunday blogging ritual. Head over to Jim Adams blog to check out the rules and read some of the great responses to the weekly prompt.

Blog, SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – Nina Simone


Welcome back to Song Lyric Sunday. I took a break last Sunday, but I am back this week to share one of my favorite songs, especially because the prompt this week was my suggestion. Jim’s description of the prompt is:

This week we have another prompt that is very different, that being using a song that features a contrast in it.  This prompt was suggested by Maggie From Cave Walls and she said that she will be showing up “with the proverbial bells on – in contrasting colors of course!”  Everybody needs to look for a song that features lyrics that include stuff like females and males, loud vs. silent, wet vs. dry, or hot vs. cold, Coke vs. Pepsi, war and peace, love and hate, bad and good or the Moon and Sun.  I think this will be fun for everyone.


Nina Simone was born in a small town in North Carolina and it just so happens to be the town in which we bought our retirement home. There is area downtown which houses a statue of her (photos at the end of the post). Recently, the house she was born in made the news when four artists pulled together the money to buy the house and it is now in the process of being restored and preserved.

Nina Simone started her music career in the Methodist churches where her mother was a minister. The song “Sinnerman” was often played urging members of the congregation to confess their sins and be saved.

“Sinnerman” or “Sinner Man” is an African American spiritual that seems to have derived from the lyrics of different songs over the course of time. The song is about trying to hide from our transgressions. It is the contrast between good and evil, heaven and hell — the temptations many have struggled with.

“Sinner Man” was first recorded in 1956 by the Les Baxter orchestra. The lead vocals performed by Will Holt, a talented singer/lyricist from Portland, Maine. On this recording, Holt is credited along with Baxter for writing the song, but that has been disputed. It has been recorded throughout the years by many different artists.

I chose to feature Nina Simone’s version. Ms. Eunice Kathleen Wayman was born in the town where I now live. She was a trained classical pianist and spent the summer of 1950 training at Juilliard preparing for application to the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. She was turned down feeling as if she was rejected because of her race. She began playing piano at the Midnight Bar & Grill in Atlantic City, NJ to help her pay for private classical lessons. There she was told she would also be required to sing. She changed her name to Nina Simone to hide what she was doing from her mother who would never approve of her playing this type of music.  (The contrast of good music and the devil’s music.)

Given the state of civil rights in our country today, I wanted to pay homage to her early voice in support of the Civil Rights Movement. (At one of her early concerts at the age of 12, her parents were made to sit in the back because they were black. She stood and said she refused to play if her parents (both ministers) could not sit in the front row.)

She wrote “Mississippi Goddam” in protest of the murder of Medgar Evers snd the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church where four young African American girls were killed. In 2019, the song was song was chosen by the Library of Congress to be included in the National Recording Registry for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Nina Simone was diagnosed with bipolar disorder (contrasting periods of extreme highs and extreme lows) and she could be difficult to work with. She was bold and brash and opinionated based on the interviews I watched with her. She lived much of her life outside of the country because of the way black people were treated in this country and because of the way she felt the recording industry tried to take advantage of her.  There is so much about her that I could not do justice to. She led a fascinating and sometimes difficult life.

Sinnerman
Lyrics from songmeanings.com

Oh, sinnerman, where you gonna run to?
Sinnerman where you gonna run to?
Where you gonna run to?
All on that day
We got to run to the rock
Please hide me, I run to the rock
Please hide me, run to the rock
Please hide here
All on that day
But the rock cried out
I can’t hide you, the rock cried out
I can’t hide you, the rock cried out
I ain’t gonna hide you there
All on that day
I said rock
What’s the matter with you rock?
Don’t you see I need you, rock?
Good Lord, Lord
All on that day
So I run to the river
It was bleedin’, I run to the sea
It was bleedin’, I run to the sea
It was bleedin’, all on that day
So I run to the river
It was boilin’, I run to the sea
It was boilin’, I run to the sea
It was boilin’, all on that day

So I run to the Lord
Please hide me, Lord
Don’t you see me prayin’?
Don’t you see me down here prayin’?
But the Lord said
Go to the Devil, the Lord said
Go to the Devil
He said go to the Devil
All on that day
So I ran to the Devil
He was waitin’, I ran to the Devil
He was waitin’, ran to the Devil
He was waitin’, all on that day
I cried, power, power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Kingdom (power, Lord)
Kingdom (power, Lord)
Kingdom (power, Lord)
Kingdom (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)

Oh yeah
Oh yeah
Oh yeah
Well, I run to the river
It was boilin’, I run to the sea
It was boilin’, I run to the sea
It was boilin’, all on that day
So I ran to the Lord
I said Lord, hide me
Please hide me
Please help me, all on that day
He said, hide?
Where were you?
When you oughta have been prayin’
I said Lord, Lord
Hear me prayin’, Lord, Lord
Hear me prayin’, Lord, Lord
Hear me prayin’, all on that day
Sinnerman, you oughta be prayin’
Outghta be prayin’, sinnerman
Oughta be prayin’, all on that day

Up come power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
(Power, Lord)
Hold down (power, Lord)
Go down (power, Lord)
Kingdom (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Power (power, Lord)
Na-na-na, na-na-na-na
Na-na-na, na-na-na-na
Na-na-na, na-na-na-na

Woah, ho
Ha-ha-ha-ha
Ha-ha-ha-ha, oh Lord
Nu, nu, nu
No-no-no-no, ma-na-na-na-na, don’t you know I need you Lord?
Don’t you know that I need you?
Don’t you know that I need you?

Oh, Lord
Wait
Oh, Lord
Oh, Lord, Lord

Interview with Nina Simone

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Why not join in on this Sunday blogging ritual. Head over to Jim Adams blog to check out the rules and read some of the great responses to the weekly prompt.