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Go Stand In The Corner! Property for Sale

Today is the premiere of John Holton’s (TheSoundofOneHandTyping.com) new Blog Hop Go Stand in the corner! where we are free to admonish whomever we might find ourselves at odds with at this particular moment.

I would like to escort the telephone spammers that call or text my husband every morning from the great state of Florida into the corner.

It seems his phone number has inadvertently been published as the owner of a piece of Florida property he does not own nor has ever seen. And every day he receives one or two calls asking if he wants to sell the property.

A couple of weeks ago he received the following text:

God bless! This is Kerry. How much would you sell your property for? My partner and I would like to buy it cash

After months of these daily calls, he finally decided to respond with something other than a request for them to stop the calls and texts. His response was:

With all the offers lately, $795,000 could be interesting.”

Crickets.

The calls have slowed down since then although they still have not stopped. It’s unfortunate because I think he was willing to negotiate.

Phone spammers – to the corner! And while we are at it, let’s throw the “Do Not Call Registry” in there, too.

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One Liner Wednesday – A New Day in America

HOPE SMILES FROM THE THRESHOLD OF THE YEAR TO COME, WHISPERING ‘IT WILL BE HAPPIER’
Alfred Lord Tennyson

Hope.

As we enter today, we are a nation divided. It will take work and perseverance to being us together. We are a nation grieving the loss of over 400,000 of our citizens to the pandemic. It has broken us in ways we could never have imagined.

I pray for a peaceful transition of power and a nation that wants to heal the divide.

Without hope, we have nothing.


One Liner Wednesday is brought to us each week by Linda Hill. Check out Linda’s blog to see what others have to say with just one line.

 

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The Art of the Road Trip

 

Roadway
Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

When I was a kid, road trips and Sunday drives were the norm. It was not at all unusual for mom to whip up some southern fried chicken and potato salad, throw it in the cooler and load up the car for a Sunday drive.

The rural highways in southwest Virginia were dotted with cement picnic tables at pullovers along the highway. These roadways were not nearly as populated as they now are, nor were the highways as well traveled. We meandered along, just enjoying getting out away from the small contained environment we lived in.

We never traveled by other means. No trains (in my lifetime) or buses or airplanes. Everything was by car – Dad driving, Mom riding shotgun and four kids piled into the backseat of whatever Buick we had at the time.

We spent our time talking or singing folk songs until some of us would wear ourselves out and fall asleep. I usually stayed awake to keep Dad company. We had some of our best talks when everyone else was sleeping.

It was on these trips I learned how a car could draft behind a truck (dangerous I know now) and save on gas according to my dad. I learned about my family and saw the places my parents frequented growing up. I learned what a mirage was on hot days when I thought I could see a lake on the road ahead of us.

We pulled our arms up and down urging truckers to reward us with a blow of their horn. We had a game we played counting station wagons we saw along the way shouting ‘my wagon’ to claim the car before someone else. I don’t think there are enough station wagons on the roads these days to make that game much fun.

Dad was a risk taker. When Interstate 77 was being built, he always snuck on the highway, bypassing the blockades to test out the new roads. Even then I had a strong sense of what I felt was right and wrong and I did not like my father breaking the rules.

Before the pandemic, we took road trips often to see our family. I often made the 8 hour drive to Florida to spend a week or two with my daughter and her family. I miss the freedom of just packing up the car on a whim and hitting the road.

When it is safe again, I look forward to heading out to see some of the places I’ve always wanted to visit. I’d like to go back to Maine and Vermont, and maybe even take a drive across country. There’s always Mackinac Island, and I’d love to visit Greenfield Village again. So much to enjoy. But this will all be after our family gets sick of us and suggests, kindly of course, we “hit the road”.

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Thank You Followers

Thank you

Today I noticed my followers rolled over the 800 mark. While I know not all those followers are ‘real’ there are many who are faithful readers and commenters. It is humbling to share my thoughts and be heard and responded to in this great void of silence brought on by the pandemic we are living through. Never in my lifetime has the entire world experienced such a devastating event simultaneously. I hope it might reflect a deeper understanding of our shared humanity.

I thank you. For your readership, your comments, and your engaging and thoughtful posts as well. I am proud to be a part of a community that enriches my life in so many ways.

 

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Monday Missive

It seems like these last few days have lasted a month. I have still not recovered enough to write much in the way of lighthearted posts. That being said, here’s my best shot at putting thoughts on paper (sic).

  • “Measure twice, cut once.” Words I remember from the television show “This Old House” exchanged between Bob Vila and Norm Abram. I will stretch its meaning by advising you to check your documentation once, twice, thrice. I found a document I’ve had for almost 4 years that may answer some genealogy questions which have stumped me in my research since I began.
  • Yesterday I mentioned we have been watching another UK show “Detectorists”. Neither of us really understand why we enjoy it so much, but we do. We just finished the series “No Offence” which was good – but whoah – rather graphic in places.
  • I am trying not to think about what is happening in my country, but it is all I can think about. Watching tv or working on projects helps, but it is just so heartbreaking to me. As a veteran, it is so hard for me to fathom. I never thought I would see this day.
  • I just signed up for a Zoom art class this afternoon. I am anxious to see how that goes.
  • We ordered seed potatoes to be delivered in March. We bought some early, mid, and late harvest potatoes. We are going to try the container method and see what happens.
  • My writing class is moving along although I have yet to be presented with a subject I am finding compelling enough to compose any essay-like material. The response to everything seems to be colored by the pandemic.
  • We are now in the group available to get the vaccine. We have completed the interest survey but all appointments are booked through the month of February unless they receive more of the vaccine. At least I feel like we have made the first step.
  • The last few nights I resumed my practice of falling asleep to soothing music. This is still my Go-To sleep music if you need something to relax to: