SLS

Song Lyric Sunday – Woodwinds and Brass

The prompt from Jim:

This week the theme is songs that feature wind instruments which includes Brass instruments (horns, trumpets, trombones, euphoniums, and tubas) and Woodwind instruments (recorders, flutes, oboes, clarinets, saxophones, and bassoons) suggested by Maggie From Cave Walls.


Another prompt you can blame on me. I know some might struggle with the prompt, but I had a hard time narrowing down the field. I tried to stay away from the most popular and recognizable songs, although the ones I chose will be familiar to some.

I decided to stick with woodwind instruments. I played the flute in high school band so this was a familiar area to me. I chose several fairly popular songs that highlight each of the instruments.

Clarinet

”When I’m 64” was recorded by the Beatles and included in the 1967 album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Club Band”. The melody was written by Paul McCartney at about the age of 14. According to McCartney, the song is written in a cabaret style. Rock and Roll was just beginning at the time. The song is credited as a McCartney Lennon collaboration. It includes a trio of clarinets throughout the song, which included jazz musician Al Newman.

When I get older losing my hair
Many years from now
Will you still be sending me a Valentine
Birthday greetings, bottle of wine

If I’d been out till quarter to three
Would you lock the door
Will you still need me, will you still feed me
When I’m sixty-four

You’ll be older too
And if you say the word
I could stay with you

I could be handy, mending a fuse
When your lights have gone
You can knit a sweater by the fireside
Sunday mornings go for a ride
Doing the garden, digging the weeds
Who could ask for more
Will you still need me, will you still feed me
When I’m sixty-four

Every summer we can rent a cottage
In the Isle of Wight, if it’s not too dear
We shall scrimp and save
Grandchildren on your knee
Vera Chuck & Dave

Send me a postcard, drop me a line
Stating point of view
Indicate precisely what you mean to say
Yours sincerely, wasting away
Give me your answer, fill in a form
Mine for evermore
Will you still need me, will you still feed me
When I’m sixty-four

*****

Flute

The Marshall Tucker Band is an American country rock band from Spartanburg, South Carolina. Their music incorporates a bluesy jazzy sound. “Heard It In a Love Song” was written by Toy Caldwell, one of the forming band members. Recorded in 1977, it features flautist Jerry Eubank who also played saxophone both of which contributed  to the trademark sound of the band.

I ain’t never been with a woman long enough for my boots to get old
But we’ve been together so long now, they both need re-soled
If I ever settle down, you’d be my kind
And it’s a good time for me to head on down the line

(Heard it in a love song, heard it in a love song)
(Heard it in a love song) can’t be wrong

I’m the kind of man who likes to get away
Who likes to start dreamin’ about tomorrow today
Never said that I loved you, even though it’s so
Where’s that duffle bag of mine, it’s time to go

(Heard it in a love song, heard it in a love song)
(Heard it in a love song) can’t be wrong

I’m gonna be leavin’ at the break of dawn
Wish you could come but I don’t need no woman taggin’ along
Gonna sneak out that door, couldn’t stand to see you cry
I’d stay another year if I saw a teardrop in your eye

(Heard it in a love song, heard it in a love song)
(Heard it in a love song) can’t be wrong

I never had a damn thing but what I had, I had to leave it behind
You’re the hardest thing I ever tried to get off my mind
Always something greener on the other side of that hill
I was born a wrangler and a rounder and I guess I always will

(Heard it in a love song, heard it in a love song)
(Heard it in a love song) can’t be wrong

*****

Oboe

“Twist in My Sobriety” was written and recorded by British pop star Tanita Tikaram, released in 1988. The oboe is featured prominently in the song, played masterfully by British oboist Malcolm Messiter. The song, according to Tikaram, is about the rather disconnected feeling an adolescent feels when reaching adulthood.

All God’s children need traveling shoes
Drive your problems from here
All good people read good books
Now your conscience is clear
I hear you talk girl
Now your conscience is clear

In the morning I wipe my brow
Wipe the miles away
I like to think I can be so willed
And never do what you say
I’ll never hear you
And never do what you say

Look my eyes are just holograms
Look your love has drawn red from my hands
From my hands you know you’ll never be
More than twist in my sobriety
More than twist in my sobriety
More than twist in my sobriety

We just poked a little empty pie
For the fun people had at night
Late at night don’t need hostility
Timid smile and pause to free

I don’t care about their different thoughts
Different thoughts are good for me
Up in arms and chaste and whole
All God’s children took their toll

Look my eyes are just holograms
Look your love has drawn red from my hands
From my hands you know you’ll never be
More than twist in my sobriety
More than twist in my sobriety
More than twist in my sobriety

Cup of tea, take time to think, yea
Time to risk a life, a life, a life
Sweet and handsome
Soft and porky
You pig out ’til you’ve seen the light
Pig out ’til you’ve seen the light

Half the people read the papers
Read them good and well
Pretty people, nervous people
People have got to sell
News you have to sell

Look my eyes are just holograms
Look your love has drawn red from my hands
From my hands you know you’ll never be
More than twist in my sobriety
More than twist in my sobriety

Look my eyes are just holograms
Look your love has drawn red from my hands
From my hands you know you’ll never be
More than twist in my sobriety
More than twist in my sobriety
More than twist in my sobriety

*****

Saxophone and flute

”Moondance” was written and recorded by Northern Irish musician Van Morrison. Included on the album of the same name in 1970, the single was not released until 1977.  Collin Tilton played the flute and the alto sax played by Jack Schroer. The song was originally written as an instrumental with the lyrics added later.

Well, it’s a marvelous night for a moondance
With the stars up above in your eyes
A fantabulous night to make romance
‘Neath the cover of October skies
And all the leaves on the trees are falling
To the sound of the breezes that blow
And I’m trying to please to the calling
Of your heart-strings that play soft and low
And all the night’s magic seems to whisper and hush
And all the soft moonlight seems to shine in your blush

Can I just have one more moondance with you, my love
Can I just make some more romance with you, my love

Well, I want to make love to you tonight
I can’t wait ’til the morning has come
And I know now the time is just right
And straight into my arms you will run
And when you come my heart will be waiting
To make sure that you’re never alone
There and then all my dreams will come true, dear
There and then I will make you my own
And every time I touch you, you just tremble inside
And I know how much you want me that you can’t hide

Can I just have one more moondance with you, my love
Can I just make some more romance with you, my love

Well, it’s a marvelous night for a moondance
With the stars up above in your eyes
A fantabulous night to make romance
‘Neath the cover of October skies
And all the leaves on the trees are falling
To the sound of the breezes that blow
And I’m trying to please to the calling
Of your heart-strings that play soft and low
And all the night’s magic seems to whisper and hush
And all the soft moonlight seems to shine in your blush

Can I just have one more moondance with you, my love
Can I just make some more romance with you, my love

One more moondance with you in the moonlight
On a magic night
La, la, la, la in the moonlight
On a magic night
Can’t I just have one more dance with you my love


Song Lyric Sunday is hosted every Sunday by Jim Adams. If you would like to join in the fun, check out his blog for the rules and to take in all the other music posted by other blogg

Blog, fiction, SoCS

SoCS – A Fictional Story for a Saturday

Linda is back with a new challenge for us this week. Pop over to Linda’s place to join in: Life in Progress – check out the rules and the contribution of other bloggers.

This week, the prompt is:

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “boo.” Find a word with the letters “boo” in it or use “boo” as is and base your post on it. Enjoy!


This story could be true, but alas, it mostly and utterly completely 100% false. As a matter of fact, it is a lie of epic proportions. It is a made up story of a little boy who had but one dream – to become a star.

Little Boo Ridley grew up deep in the heart of Texas. They were neither rich nor poor nor even middle class for that matter. His parents, Loula Mae Ridley (a bookkeeper) and Clarence Ridley ( a boom operator) encouraged little Boo to pursue his dream of being in a band. They tried to support him in any way they could.

He first became a roadie working for Booker T and the MG’s, but he tired of all the instrumental music. He thought if he heard “Green Onions” one more time he might go insane. He had a brief stint as a songwriter. His most successful gig was writing for Sly and the Family Stone. He was disheartened when he was not credited as co-writer on “I Want to Take You Higher”. After all his penning of the phrase “boom laka laka laka” was what made that song!

He moved through the circuit only to get hired for one boondoggle after another. He finally took to the bottle and started boozing it up. Before long, he found himself living down in the boondocks far from the right side of town. He fell in love with a girl that lived up on the hill and wrote a song about her. 

Sadly, he had only scribbled the words down on the back of a paper bag. One night, down on his luck, looking for money for a bus ticket home, he sold his song to a guy named Joe. Sure, it needed some tweaking, but he thought it was catchy. 

After scraping together enough money for a bus ticket, he heard a song. The words were familiar. I took him a minute to realize it was his song made famous by someone else and he had squandered away another chance for success. it was yet another loss for the books.

How could he go home now? Failure was a taboo subject in his household. He dragged himself off the bus at the next station. He  needed a drink but all he could afford now was some Boone’s Farm. He asked around until he found a local bootlegger. 

He knew when he took that first sip it would only be a matter of time before he was playing peekaboo with the boogey man.


Many thanks to the artists of my youth for providing inspiration for my story. I love them all!

Blog

Recycle for Food – #WATWB

Image that says we are the world

Welcome back to the monthly bloghop – We Are The World Blogfest. The last Friday of each month is dedicated to shining a light on the good news throughout our world.


WATWB is co-hosted this month by Sylvia McGrath and Belinda Witzenhausen.


Plastic is too prevalent in our society and we need more incentives to recycle. Bali, like many other locations that rely on tourism, suffered during the pandemic. Pollution from plastic increased and money to buy food decreased. But imagine what would happen if collected plastic waste was used as currency with which food could be purchased?

You can read the entire story below.

Guy Schemes to Give Free Food to Anyone in Bali Who Brings Plastic – And He’s Recycled 500 Tons in First Year


Want to read more good news or join in the effort to contribute to the spreading of good news throughout the world? Use the hashtag #WATWB on your good news post and share it in our Facebook community here or on Twitter at @WATWB so others can read your post.

Blog

Throwback Thursday #10 – Nicknames


Throwback Thursday Memory Blog Hop is run by Lauren this week. We take turns posting this challenge every Thursday. Participation is easy.

  • Write your own post sharing your memories and leave a pingback to this post in the comments.
  • You can use the photo above in your post to make it easier to find.
  • Tag it with #TBTMemory or #IRememberWhen.
  • If you do not wish to write your own post, feel free to tell your story in the comments below.

This week’s prompt is: Nicknames

Did you grow up with a nickname? Was the nickname a form of endearment or a shielded criticism? Has your nickname influenced you in any way? Did you ever give a nickname to a family member? Have you tried to get rid of a nickname?  If you could give yourself your own nickname what might it be?


Almost everyone in our family had nicknames. Many of them were just a shortened version of their given names. I never knew my ‘Uncle Badeye’s’ real name was Hubert, nor my ‘Aunt Hainty’s’ real name was Elon until I was in high school.

My siblings and I all had nicknames given to us along the way – most given to us by our parents. We each called each other by those nicknames for our entire lives – always as terms of endearment.

I was not ‘Maggie’ until I left home. It is a shortened version of my given name that I took myself. My mother called me ‘MagCindy’ and that is what both my sisters continued to call me until they passed away.

When I was a toddler, I was fond of shedding my diaper or underpants and running around the yard. Johnny, the older boy that lived next door gave me the nickname ‘Nakipoo’. He was the only one who called me that consistently although some people in my family called me that occasionally. I ran into Johnny a few years ago when I returned home for a visit and he greeted me by saying “Well, if it isn’t little Nakipoo!” It was never said in a mean way but I suppose that is how he has always remembered me even after all these years. Trust me, I don’t run around that way any longer!

When my daughter first started school, she made me a Mother’s Day card. In the card she professed her commitment to clean for me. She misspelled ‘Mommy’ on the card. Of course I kept everything and she happened upon the card later as an adult and I forever became ‘Momy’.

We also became ‘bears’ as my daughter and her wife started referring to us as ‘Mama Bear’ and ‘Papa Bear’. Now they have the word ‘bear’ tacked onto the end of their names, too.

I have never had nicknames I felt were intended to be derogatory or hurtful in any way.

I grew up in the south and everyone was ‘honey’ or ‘sweetie’. Again, it is a term endearment, but I learned all too quickly that it is not received that way by others. I had enough vicious comments in response to a term I was raised with, I have cut it out of my vocabulary except for a few very close people. I understand how women may be offended by the term, especially when used by men they do not know so it is just easier not to use it.

I have a couple of terms of affection I use with my husband but we mostly refer to one another by our given names. I call my grandsons ‘buddy’ or ‘my buddy’ but most of my granddaughters are simply addressed by their given names or a shortened version of their given names. They are always used as terms of endearment.

Blog

One Liner Wednesday – Back to the Parkway

“Mountains are not stadiums where I satisfy my ambition to achieve, they are the cathedrals where I practice my religion.” Anatoli Boukreev


We took a trip back up to the parkway Monday. I am so glad we did. The high winds started last night and I am sure it brought many of the leaves to the ground. This is where I find peace.


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One liner Wednesday is brought to us each week by the lovely Linda Hill. Please visit Linda’s blog (to read the rules, read other one liners, and possibly join in the fun!)