SoCS

SoCS – My Wagon!

Continued thanks to Linda Hill who sponsors this lovely stream of consciousness every week. Every Friday she provides a new word to spark our minds into action.

Check out Linda’s blog if you want to join in – check out the rules and the contribution of other bloggers. This week, the prompt is:

Your Friday prompt for Stream of Consciousness Saturday is “my.” Start your post with the word “My.” Bonus points if you end your post with “yours.” Enjoy!


“My wagon!”

Those two words always started the game. Our family took a lot of road trips, many taking 12 hours to complete. Some shorter, but the long rides were murder if you had nothing to pass the time. So we counted station wagons.

It was Dad’s game really, and somehow he always seemed to win. The whole purpose of the game was to see a station wagon before anyone else in the car and claim it by shouting “My wagon!” (Younger readers may have played a more violent game called ‘punch buggy’ in which the goal of the game was to claim Volkswagon Beetles by exclaiming “Punch Buggy” followed by a punch in the arm.) Now back to the 1960s.

Station wagons were THE family car in the sixties. They were everywhere. My siblings and I loved them because they were so roomy. This was before seatbelts, so we sprawled everywhere and moved around a lot. There were six in our family. Dad always drove and Mom rode ‘shotgun’. My siblings and I fought for space in the back. We had one station wagon that had a third seat in the back that faced backwards toward the road behind the car – the ‘way back’ seat aptly named because kids could see the ‘way back’ or you were seated ‘way back in the back’. My brother and I always seemed to get that seat, but that was cool because our parents couldn’t see what we were doing. It wasn’t great for counting wagons unless they were coming up behind you. I never once thought what might happen if someone rammed into the back of our station wagon!

We would drive down the road and you could hear multiple voices calling out “My wagon!” and arguing over who saw it first. I don’t know how my parents did not lose their minds.

Everyone would eventually get tired and we kids would lay our heads down to nap. Just as the game would die down and we would start to drift off my dad would yell “My wagon!” He was the biggest kid of all.

We played a lot of games and sang a lot of song in our travels. The trips were often long, but Mom and Dad always made it fun. Our road trips were always an adventure. How about yours?

26 thoughts on “SoCS – My Wagon!”

  1. Great SoCS. We had a varied version of punch buggy. Step-dad three or four (I’m not 100% sure which) had an ex who drove a red VW bug. It was a game, that whenever we were out and about to holler red bug, red bug if we saw one. It was years later until I realized they were panicked about her finding him.

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    1. Oh, my! What a story, Lauren. It makes dodging the ex even a little more interesting. My grandson liked to play ‘punch buggy yellow’ where we looked only for yellow bugs.

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  2. When I was young, so many cars were black, a red car was a rarity. So my mum would tell me to look out for red cars, and count how many I had seen on the trip. It was mainly a way of trying to stop me being car-sick, but rarely worked for that.
    Best wishes, Pete.

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    1. My sister always got car sick, but I never had that problem. Hers seemed so much worse if she was confined to the back seat of the car. You are right about the car colors, Pete. They were so much more limited than they are now.

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  3. Always love reading the stories and memories you share, you always paint such a clear picture Maggie. Myself and Rich have our own version of this game where we do the VW hand gesture every time we see a camper van on the road (oh to own one, one day!), much prefer this to the punch buggy game you mentioned, much less bruises!

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  4. Great memories, Maggie. I remember those road trips. The toys we put in the car to have something to do besides play games. My father loved his station wagon. Thanks for the memory jog.

    Good job scoring those bonus point!

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    1. When our grandson was young and spent a week with us each summer, we often had him in the car for eight hours. They like the electronic entertainment more than the choices we had. I love a good road trip to this day, though. Such great memories!

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  5. I loved your bit of nostalgia. Our family road trips were quite the same. I was either pushed to the way way back or the hump in the middle of the second seat. The most common game was I spy. And every once in a while the license plate game. Where we would look for how many states we could collect. On our road trip to the Grand Canyon we saw all but one

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    1. Oh, Jill! I had forgotten about the hump in the middle of the back seat! That brings back a lot of memories. A road trip to the Grand Canyon must have been quite the adventure. The roads leading up to the canyon are rather isolated today – I can only imagine what it must have been like then.

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  6. We had a Chevy Impala growing up since it was only my brother and I taking up the back seat. No need for a station wagon. But I remember playing games in the car, claiming things as we went down the alphabet, or spying things of a certain color. It was good family fun that even my mother took part in (dad concentrated on his driving).

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    1. We had to be creative and use our imaginations to help pass the time. My father-in-law played a game with my children where they collected various things, but when we passed a cemetery, they had to bury what they had counted and start over. Those road trios were much shorter.

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  7. Yes there used to be lots of station wagons back then. I mentioned on your other prompt taking my driving test in our family wagon. Then me and the Mr. had a couple of them over the years, and our girls were all over the seats like acrobats (before seat belts!!!)

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    1. I remember that you took your test in a station wagon. Those were not small and easy to maneuver. Things have certainly changed with the safety precautions. It is a wonder so many generations survived.

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  8. We took some long trips but didn’t have a station wagon that I wished for so I could wave at people coming up behind us or sprawl around. So you were lucky. I do remember singing songs and playing games. My dad finally got a station wagon when I was a older and had to wear a seatbelt. “My wagon” is much better than “punchbuggy.”

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          1. No, much easier and now with Uber and Lyft, urban areas have another mode of transportation. We have one Uber driver I think. 😂

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