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Moving Slowly Into Fall

This morning there is evidence of change outside my window.

Two Rose Breasted Grosbeaks arrived this morning. Evidence of their migration south. We only see them in the spring and the fall as they pass through toward their ultimate destination. They only migrate at night, so their visit here must have been for refueling. The color of the males has faded from bright red to a dark pink now. When they come back in spring they will be bright red.

Rose Breasted Grosbeak – Image Courtesy of Pixabay

The hummingbirds are still here, but they may be different birds rather than the same birds every day. They are flying much slower now that the air has suddenly gone cool. This makes them more vulnerable to predators.

The air is cool, the sky overcast. It almost feels somber.

Maybe that is because we had a bird strike the window this morning. Hubby donned some gloves and rescued it, putting it on a warm towel. It is up standing now, but whether it will survive, it is too early to say. It makes me sad to see this happen. There are so many homes like ours with windows that fool the birds as they see the reflection of the trees and think it is a continuation of the tree line. Bird strikes are one of the leading causes of bird deaths in the U.S.

The goldfinches have lost their yellow color in favor of their winter brown. They will be faithful visitors to the feeder all year, as will the cardinals. The downy woodpeckers are not happy that we have run out of suet. They have a very discerning palate.

We finally had some rain over the last two days. Very scant amounts, but enough to brighten up the green color of the leaves. Yesterday we cleaned out our raised beds and planted our fall vegetables. We will enjoy lettuce, and hopefully kale and Swiss chard until it gets really cold. We ran out of room before we could set any onions or plant any radish seeds.

The direction of the sun has changed. It will not be long before the sunbeams will again warm the floors of our living room.

I wonder how many falls I have experienced without noticing any of this? Quite a few I am afraid. I think this is one of my greatest pleasures in retirement. My life has slowed down and I can see all the things a structured and busy life pulls us away from.

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H is for Hysterectomy

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I am always amazed at how brave and vulnerable my daughter has been in sharing her story about her emergency hysterectomy. In her blog today, she shares her experience with the actual surgery and all the fear she had about going under anesthesia. It is a fear many of us can relate to, — giving up control and trusting others to keep us alive.

Two Moms And A Toddler

This is the one. This is the blog where I talk about my actual hysterectomy so if you’re a woman seeking answers to the unknown, my hope is that this particular segment will bring you some peace of mind and some comfort. First, I want to say that every hysterectomy experience is different. A lot of what you’ll experience is dependent on the type of hysterectomy you have.

The first hysterectomy in history was performed in 1843 in Manchester England and the first total (uterus and cervix removed)abdominal hysterectomy was performed in 1910. Unfortunately, in these times, these surgeries had a 70% mortality rate mainly due to sepsis but also hemorrhage, a condition known as peritonitis which is when there is inflammation in the tissue that lines the inner wall of the abdomen, and exhaustion. Oh! And it was done with NO anesthesia. Luckily for we women, there have been…

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Song Lyric Sunday – Trucks

The prompt this week is bus/truck/Lorry.


I went went back to my country roots this week. If we are talking trucks, you know country has a lot of good selections. My mind first went back to some very old classics, but then I decided I wanted to feature a little more contemporary choices. Then, do I choose a male or a female artist? I could not decide, so I am giving you both.

The first selection is “Pickup Man” recorded by Joe Diffie. The song was written by Kerry Kurt Phillips and Howard Perdew. The  accompanying video was recorded in its entirety at a drive-in movie theater in Tennessee.

The title has a dual meaning. The singer drives a ‘pickup’ and also uses it to ‘pickup’ women. It is a fun, not to be taken too seriously, song.

LYRICS
Well, I got my first truck when I was three
Drove a hundred thousand miles on my knees
I hauled marbles and rocks and thought twice before
I hauled a Barbie doll bed for the girl next door
She tried to pay me with a kiss and I began to understand
There’s something women like about a pickup man
When I turned sixteen I saved a few hundred bucks
My first car was a pickup truck
I was cruisin’ the town and the first girl I see
Is Bobbie Joe Gentry, the homecoming queen
She flagged me down and climbed up in the cab
And said “I never knew you were a pickup man!”
You can set my truck on fire and roll it down a hill
And I still wouldn’t trade it for a Coupe de Ville
I’ve got an eight-foot bed that never has to be made
You know if it weren’t for trucks we wouldn’t have tailgates
I met all my wives in traffic jams
There’s just something women like about a pickup man
Most Friday nights I can be found
In the bed of my truck on an old chaisse lounge
Backed into my spot at the drive-in show
You know a cargo light gives off a romantic glow
I never have to wait in line at the popcorn stand
Cuz there’s something women like about a pickup man
You can set my truck on fire and roll it down a hill
And I still wouldn’t trade it for a Coupe de Ville
I’ve got an eight-foot bed that never has to be made
You know if it weren’t for trucks we wouldn’t have tailgates
I met all my wives in traffic jams
There’s just something women like about a pickup man
You can set my truck on fire and roll it down a hill
And I still wouldn’t trade it for a Coupe de Ville
I’ve got an eight-foot bed that never has to be made
You know if it weren’t for trucks we wouldn’t have tailgates
I met all my wives in traffic jams
There’s just something women like about a pickup man
Yes there’s something women like about a pickup man

Now on to a selection by a female artist.

For this me I again chose a country song recorded by Sara Evans — “Suds in The Bucket”. The song was written by Billy Montana and Tammy Wagoner.

The song tells the story of a young woman who was raised “right” but still ran off to Las Vegas with her boyfriend in a white pickup truck. She leaves the “suds in the bucket” and the clothes on the line. No more laundry for her!

LYRICS

She was in the back yard
Say it was a little past nine
When her prince pulled up
A white pick-up truck
Her folks shoulda seen it comin’
It was only just a matter of time
Plenty old enough
And you can’t stop love
She stuck a note on the screen door
Sorry but I got to go
And that was all she wrote
Her Mama’s heart was broke
And that was all she wrote
And so the story goes

Now her Daddy’s in the kitchen
Starin’ out the window
Scratchin’ and a rackin’ his brains
How can eighteen years just up and walk away
Our little pony tailed girl
Growed up to be a woman
Now she’s gone in the blink of an eye
She left the suds in the bucket
And the clothes hangin’ out on the line
Now don’t you wonder what the preacher’s
Gonna preach about Sunday morn’
Nothing quite like this
Has happened here before
Well he must of been looker
A smooth talkin’ son of a gun
For such a grounded girl
To just up and run
Of course you can’t fence time
And you can’t stop love
Now all the biddies in the beauty shop
Gossip goin’ non-stop
Sippin’ on pink lemonade
How could eighteen years just up and walk away
Our little pony tailed girl
Growed up to be a woman
Now she’s gone in the blink of an eye
She left the suds in the bucket
And the clothes hangin’ out on the line
Yee Hoo
She’s got her pretty little bare feet
Hangin’ out the window
And they’re headed up to Vegas tonight
How could 18 years just up and walk away
Our little pony tailed girl
Growed up to be a woman
Now she’s gone in the blink of an eye
She left the suds in the bucket
And the clothes hangin’ out on the line
She left the suds in the bucket
And the clothes hangin’ out on the line
She was in the backyard
Say it was a little past nine
When her prince pulled up
A white pick-up truck
Plenty old enough
And you can’t stop love
And no you can’t fence time
And you can’t stop love

Jim Adams provides the weekly topics that serve as the inspiration for Song Lyric Sunday. Check out his blog for the rules and read some of the other contributions in the comments section.